Ravens Rookies Dish Out Lunch and Encouragement

Ravens Rookies Dish Out Lunch and EncouragementRavens Rookies Dish Out Lunch and Encouragement

By Jake Lourim

When Gary Byers played high school football at Oxon Hill, his coach would tell him, “If by some miracle you wind up in the end zone with the football, just act like you’ve been there.”

Byers is now deputy director at the Helping Up Mission shelter, where the Ravens’ 23 first-year players visited Monday to meet residents and serve lunch. Even the rookies, Byers figured, are used to being asked for autographs by now.

He wanted to act like he’d been there before….

Watch the video and read the full article HERE:

jlourim@baltsun.com

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Copyright © 2016, The Baltimore Sun

 

SOURCE’s Partner of the Month – JUNE 2016

Helping Up Mission is Johns Hopkins Student Outreach Resource Center’s June partner of the month.

SOURCE provides academic, professional and personal development opportunities through community outreach and service-learning partnerships with community-based organizations.

We also serve as a channel for student, faculty and staff involvement with community organizations and local projects.

SOURCE has a particular, but not exclusive, focus on East Baltimore neighborhoods in close proximity to the Johns Hopkins Medical Campus.  Read More:

 

Information provided by: SOURCE

Our Partner Back on My Feet is Helping the Homeless

Article by  Megan Knight

Running can do more than just get you in shape, it can change your life. Just ask the members of the Baltimore group “Back on My Feet.”

It’s been awhile since Deon Banks did any serious running. The last time he can remember running regularly is during his time in the military.

“I’m a two to three miler kind of guy,” he said with a laugh. “If I can finish that goal in a day, I’ve accomplished something.”

Banks has been with Back on My Feet for a little over a year. The group’s mission is to combat homelessness and help people who may be on the brink of being homeless. Banks found out about the program while at the Helping Up Mission, where he is staying to treat his addiction issues.


Read the Full Article at abc2news

Newsboys lead singer Michael Tait moved to tears when homeless choir sings ‘We Believe’ (video)

Written by Angie Chui. Originally published at ChristianToday.com.

Newsboys lead singer Michael Tait moved to tears when homeless choir sings 'We Believe'

Christian rock band Newsboys has been making using their gift of music to spread God’s word for years now, but when their song was performed by a group of homeless men the band’s frontman Michael Tait was moved to tears.

In the video posted by Meant 2 Live Foundation, the Newsboys lead vocalist and bandmate Duncan Phillips are welcomed to a concert venue by a homeless choir singing their song “We Believe.”

The homeless choir was part of the Helping Up Mission that was treated to a VIP experience at the Splendor concert where the Newsboys were performing and it wasn’t long before Phillips started welling up.

The song speaks of keeping faith in God when we are going through our worst challenges and features the lyrics: “In this time of desperation/When all we know is doubt and fear/ There is only one foundation/ We believe, we believe/ In this broken generation/ When all is dark, You help us see/There is only one salvation/We believe, we believe.”

The performance took on a different meaning when Tait addressed the choir members after their performance and shared his own story with them. One of the singers acknowledged that before they became part of the program, they didn’t have faith.

“We didn’t believe man, we were throwing lives and God loved us,” the man said.

Tait encouraged him to continue on the right path and praised the group for their beautiful performance.

The choir was later treated to a hearty meal and tickets to watch the band perform live to a sell-out crowd.

Our feature in Hopkins Brainwise magazine

Our feature in Hopkins Brainwise magazine

On A Mission To Treat Addictions

Partnership between Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Helping Up Mission program improves the odds for conquering substance abuse in East Baltimore.

At the height of his career, Tom Bond had a prestigious job, a house, a company car and a big salary. But the Harford County native says he never felt fulfilled by his fancy job and soon turned to drugs and alcohol. After losing several good jobs over a dozen years, he began bartending, a lifestyle that supported his addiction to cocaine. Soon he was also using heroin and eventually became destitute and homeless.
Bond found an abandoned house in East Baltimore, where he lived until he got locked up. His cellmate told him about the Helping Up Mission, a nonprofit, faith-based mission that offers a residential addictions recovery program. Bond perked up. “I didn’t want to spend another winter without a shower or a roof over my head,” he says.
Today, 13 years since that encounter, Bond is not only clean, but as director of programs for the mission, he’s helped thousands of other homeless men to reclaim their lives through the shelter’s 12-step recovery program, daily classes, and career and spiritual guidance. And for the past several years, Bond and treatment coordinator Michael Gray—another recovering addict—have shored up the mission’s efforts through a partnership with Johns Hopkins addictions experts, who come to the site daily to provide supplemental care.
Launched in 2012, in response to the mission’s request for Johns Hopkins addictions expertise, the Cornerstone Program merges…

Read the full article in Brainwise, Johns Hopkins’ psychiatry periodical.

Download the PDF version here: Hopkins BrainWise Winter 2016-10

**UPDATE** Check out the video Hopkins produced to accompany the feature article: